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Characterization of ZCF Transcription Factors That Are Expanded in the Human Pathogen Candida albicans

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Candida albicans is commonly found in humans as a commensal organism populating many areas of the body. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans gives rise to mucosal and bloodstream infections. The pathogenesis of C. albicans has not been fully understood and treatments for Candida infections are still limited. Studies have shown that a subset of genes encoding putative Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factors, called ZCF, is only expanded in pathogenic yeast and might be involved in C. albicans's virulence. This study utilizes ex vivo and in vitro approaches to characterize select ZCFs in macrophage cells and various stress environments. The findings suggest that these ZCFs may be key pathogenic determinants in C. albicans and may provide potential fungal-specific drug targets.

  • This report represents the work of one or more WPI undergraduate students submitted to the faculty as evidence of completion of a degree requirement. WPI routinely publishes these reports on its website without editorial or peer review.
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  • E-project-050114-051147
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  • 2014
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  • 2014-05-01
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