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Morphological Characterization Cortical Neurons in a mouse model of Rett Syndrome and Design of a Slice Incubation Chamber Public

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Rett Syndrome (RTT) is an autism-spectrum disorder caused by a mutation in the gene coding for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). In accordance with the theory that RTT arises from a excitatory/inhibitory imbalance caused by dendritic alterations, we hoped to observe reduced arborization in the MeCP2 mutant neurons. The dendritic morphology of pyramidal cells and interneurons proceeding from MeCP2 mutant and non-mutant mice were reconstructed and analyzed. We observed a possible difference in the area covered by the basal dendritic arborization and decreased dendritic complexity reflected in diminished process lengths and number of terminal segments. This could translate to a diminished integrative capacity in MeCP2 KO cells.

  • This report represents the work of one or more WPI undergraduate students submitted to the faculty as evidence of completion of a degree requirement. WPI routinely publishes these reports on its website without editorial or peer review.
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  • E-project-031213-075038
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  • 2013
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  • 2013-03-12
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